STEP 1:  Food Banks Centralize the Collection of Donated and Salvaged Product

Donated product arrives from the food service industry, retailers, manufacturers, distributors, growers, processors and food drives.  Food Banks also purchase protein and other special diet items to round out the mix of food available.   Last year Georgia’s regional food banks distributed more than 130 million pounds of food, including 46 million pounds of nutritious – but unsold –  food salvaged from retailers that would otherwise have been sent to a landfill.

STEP 2:  Food Banks Inspect and Sort Food 

Food Banks collect, inventory and inspect product for distribution to nearly 2,000 partner agencies and congregations in Georgia.  The regional Food Banks’ warehouses are inspected and certified by the American Institute of Baking (AIB) and they maintain food inventory systems to track food in the event of recalls.  They have coolers, freezers, refrigerated trucks and food handling equipment to move food safely to their agencies.

STEP 3:  Decentralized Distribution to Community Based Partner Agencies and Congregations  

Nearly 2,000 partner agencies and congregations receive food from Georgia’s 7 regional Food Banks – and provide food to people in need free of charge.  They include food pantries, soup kitchens, youth programs, senior centers, community kitchens, day care centers, night shelters and rehabilitation centers

STEP 4:  Partner Agencies and Congregations Distribute Food to People in Need

Deserving people from all walks of life benefit from our services.  Recipients include working families, those who have lost jobs, children, the elderly, disabled and more.  Decentralizing the distribution through community based agencies ensures that food is available in places where people are more likely to seek help.